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The way is clear for Denmark’s first LNG truck refuelling station

A graphic showing the new station's layout and location

Working with KC LNG (a part of MAKEEN Energy), Q8 is building Denmark’s first ever refuelling station for trucks running on liquefied natural gas (LNG). This ambitious project will lead to a greener road transport sector – and it is a decisive step towards a CO2 neutral future. To start, truck drivers will fill their tanks with LNG at the station, but eventually, Q8 will offer 100% fossil-free liquefied biogas (LBG).

Around 30,000 diesel-driven trucks occupy the roads of Denmark, emitting significant amounts of CO2 every day. To steer the heavy road transport sector in a greener direction, it is, therefore, essential to transition to cleaner, more sustainable fuels. KC LNG will deliver the station, which is expected to be ready at the end of 2021 – and will be the first of its kind in Denmark.

A carefully selected location

The new station will be located at Q8’s IDS station in the Danish city Padborg, which is right next to a major highway and the border to Germany. Padborg is one of Europe’s busiest transport hubs, and over 7,000 trucks make their way here each day, which will make the station a key junction for the transport of goods between Scandinavia and the rest of Europe.

“Here at Q8, we have one clear goal for this project. We want to help our customers start a sustainable transition of their transports. We are seeing a growing demand for sustainable solutions within the heavy goods transport sector, and more companies now demand that their goods be transported using more sustainable energy sources, such as gas. We want to enable our customers to get that transition going, and LNG and liquefied gas in general are highly relevant alternatives for heavy transport, which can’t just be converted to electric overnight. Our customers aren’t waiting around – they want concrete solutions,” says Gert Thomasen, Head of Fleet & IDS from Q8 Denmark.

Green light for sustainable transport

In Denmark, the road transport sector is held back by the complete lack of refuelling options for LNG. Therefore, Q8 has chosen to take the first step with this project, aiming to make it easier for North European freight companies to invest in cleaner technology. Today, LNG usage is widespread in Germany, among other countries, and on the rise in Sweden. Compared to diesel, LNG-fuelled trucks emit up to 22% less CO2 and completely eliminate the emission of harmful particulates.

”The world needs to move away from diesel and other highly polluting fuels – and this initiative is a significant milestone. One of our goals is to break down the barriers that currently hinder the use of cleaner fuel in trucks. Now we are tackling one of the big ones, which is the lack of availability,” says Frej Olsen, Head of Group LNG, KC LNG.

Fast refuelling for all trucks

The station in Padborg will be fully automatic, requiring no operator – the truck driver can fill up his own tank in just a few minutes. The station will be able to accommodate all types of trucks.

The technical solution will be delivered in collaboration with the Dutch company LIQAL. KC LNG will deliver the station as a turnkey project, handling everything from project management to civil works and installation. The station will also be delivered with an advanced online surveillance system that maximises safety and user experience.

On the road to further CO2 reductions

In the future, the station in Padborg will become even greener. Eventually, it will be able to supply liquefied biogas (LBG) – a 100% fossil-free energy source. While the switch from diesel to LNG will require new trucks, transitioning from LNG to LBG needs no further investment in refuelling stations or vehicles.

One significant advantage of LBG is that the production of biogas can accept excess and waste products from, for example, agriculture. In that way, part of the heavy transport can be converted to a fossil-free alternative, while simultaneously reducing the CO2 emissions of both the transport sector and the industries that supply the biogas producers. This will be yet another step on the way to sustainable truck transport and cleaner air.

The LNG station in Padborg will be part of a European network, as IDS (International Diesel Service) has 25 other locations that also offer LNG.